Tag Archives: neurodiversity

Star Pirates Infinity with Mark Shannelly, SHG Studios

Mark Shannelly, Marketing Coordinator and Community Manager at SHG Studios, is joining Every1Games Toronto to share his experience and discuss various aspects of design and production while we play SHG Studios Star Pirates Infinity,  a next-generation Collectible Card Game (CCG).  Mark is a Video Game Designer, Sound Designer, Musician, and Composer.



On Saturday July 8th Mark Shannelly will join Every1Games Toronto to discuss his experience in the video game industry. Every1Games participants will have the opportunity to demo the game and learn about the development process. Participants will also have the opportunity to show off the work they’ve been doing in the summer program and get professional feedback on their work.

SHG Studios is located in Hamilton, Ontario. They are industry allies joining Every1Games to help create low anxiety networking opportunities for autistic and neurodivergent youth supporting neurodiversity and the participants of our awesome programs. To thank them we’d like to promote the game Star Pirates Infinity, a fun, easy, engaging, collectable card game that can be downloaded from the website linked below, playable on PC, Mac, Android or iPhone. Check it out 🙂

Created by Every1Games student Matthew Montgomery

Programs Begin October 1st! Register Now to Save Your Spot.

It’s time to register for the next cohort of Every1Games workshops. If you’ve stumbled upon us be sure to check out the about page to learn more about what we do. The best way to learn more is to contact us.  You can also find us on facebook and twitter.

Autism, spectrum, autistic, Aspergers, learning disabilities. Just making sure that we have these words in the post because our programs are specialized to help neurodivergent youth develop the skills required to succeed in life after high school. No diagnosis is required to participate. Our programs are a low-anxiety space where we encourage you to be comfortable being you so that you can learn at your best.  Many of our staff members are also on the spectrum or identify with a disability. Here you will have access to mentors for more than creative production, but life as an adult facing the challenges that come with growing up.

In Toronto we are offering two 8 week programs Creative Production and SpecOPS. If you are new to Every1Games or more interested in video, Creative Production is for you. If you have some experience and are interested in going to college (or currently attending college for media) then join the SpecOps program and work with us to develop your skills and portfolio.  In St.Catharines  you can join us for one 8 week program focusing on the fundamentals of game design.

All of our programs offer a low-anxiety environment. If you are not sure if our programs are for you email engage@every1games.ca.

Program descriptions are below.

When: 8 Saturdays (10am to 4pm) starting October 1st.

Where: Programs are available in Toronto (George Brown College School of Design, 341 King St. E), and St.Catharines (Brock University Centre for Digital Humanities).

How Much: Program fees vary, regular fees are between $720 to $900 before discounts and subsidies. If you’d like to split payments or inquire about subsidies we can accommodate you. Let us know what works for you.  Please register to save your spot in the meantime.

 

Register online to save your spot in the program. An invoice will be created based on the information you provide in the profile. We will contact you to confirm participation. 

To Register: Create an account and fill out a profile. Be sure to fill out the profile using the information of the person who is attending the program. The invoice will be sent to the email address entered in the profile. Remember to include your birthday so that we can apply subsidies that you might qualify for. Then login to browse programs and choose the course you’d like to join. Click Read More to see the schedule, then click Next to enter discount codes. Autism Ontario members use autismont for $100.00 off! Then click Register. 🙂 We will contact you with an invoice when we confirm your participation where you will have the option to pay online or by cheque. No payment is required to save your spot in the program.

Creative Production – Toronto

Our fall Creative Production program (Coded as CREA T1016) will teach participants a variety of digital and traditional arts, and video production. No experience necessary. Discover your skills and interests working with like minded people.

SpecOps – Toronto

Our Fall SpecOps program (Coded as SPEC T1016) will teach participants how to use Unreal 4, a game design software tool used by popular studios like Ubisoft and Activision. Participants will work independently and in groups to design a game using 2D/3D art tools, programming and sound engineering software depending on the groups interests. Lead by autistic youth mentors, this 8 week program is for people interested in attending post-secondary game design programs and is open to current college students interested in improving their game design skills.

Creative Production – Niagara (St.Catharines)

Our fall Creative Production program in Niagara (Coded as GAME N1016) will teach participants the fundamentals of game design.  Participants will explore Game Maker Studio to create a playable level. No experience necessary. Our staff will challenge participants with new activities that help each student meet their goals or prepare to apply for Niagara College and Brock University game related programs.

Luigi's Restaurante created by Devonttaie Summer 2015

Save Your Spot in Toronto Summer Programs

Subsidies are available!

We are offering up to 4 weeks of creative skills development programs for autistic and neurodivergent youth in Toronto and Niagara. For information about programs based in Niagara contact us.

Don’t spend summer days alone playing games. Come to Every1Games and add to your skills set instead! Our programs are ideal for students with disabilities interested in practicing digital media design or computer science. Get serious about a future in games or join us just for fun in the low-anxiety, judgement free, neurodiverse community.

Participants will have the opportunity to explore different types of production tools in a low anxiety environment to develop social, technical and professional skills. These programs are great for beginners and for people who want to practice using the software without the pressure of grades.

Join us at George Brown College School of Design to become familiar with the fundamental tools and practices to design and develop digital media, gaming environments, music and videos. (Content will vary based on participant interests). Work with autistic advocates, mentors, and experienced digital media artists and game designers.

If you are new to Every1Games our summer programs are a great place to start becoming familiar with who we are and how we can work together to help you meet your goals. If you are a current student in art or media design, join us to strengthen your portfolio and gain experience.

Contact us! 
Subsidies, discounts and payment plans are also available for participants.  For more information please contact Program Manager Cameron Cubitt at (289) 990-9057 or at cameron@every1games.ca.

Week 1: Intro to Digital Media (GAME TS0116)
July 18, 2016 – July 22, 2016 (Monday to Friday)
Cost $450 (before discounts and subsidies)
Participants will learn about different programs that will allow them to design their own gaming art. Some of the programs will include Adobe Suite, 3DS Max and Animation.

Week 2: Panorama and Portfolio (GAME TS0216)
July 25, 2016 – July 29, 2016 (Monday to Friday)
Cost $450 (before discounts and subsidies)
Participants will be learning how to convert their gaming ideas into a portfolio or game demo over the course of the week. This program is intended to inform participants about what is needed when applying for a job with a gaming studio.

Week 3: Industry and Streaming in Digital Media (GAME TS0316)
August 2 – August 5, 2016 (Tuesday to Friday)
Cost $400 (before discounts and subsidies)
Participants will learn the tools and business of recording and streaming of video game media and will have the opportunity to interact with local game studios.

Week 4: Studio Environment (GAME TS0416)
August 8, 2016 – August 12, 2016 (Monday to Friday)
Cost $450 (before discounts and subsidies)
Participants will design a game as a group using Unity while learning about project management, compromising and planning and meeting the required deadlines for
the project. Groups that started their project in Week 3 will continue their from where they left off.

Classrooms will be supported with a 1:3 staff to student ratio. Programs will start at 10AM and conclude at 4PM. All four weeks will take place at the George Brown College St. James Campus which is located at 341 King Street East in Toronto, Ontario.

Registered participants will receive further details about the classroom closer to the start of all four programs.

Discounts and Subsidies

Autism Ontario Members receive $100 discount!

If you have an autism diagnosis and are between the age of 12 and 18, the Potential Programme provides a subsidy to help you pay for this opportunity! Over 18? No worries, thanks to Autism Ontario Toronto Chapter you may also be eligible for a subsidy that will be discounted on your invoice.

Create your Every1Games profile and contact us. We are here to help. Please note there is no proof of diagnosis required to participate in Every1Games programs.

GBC-LOGO


Every1Games New Logo Blue Header PSINC


Potential Programme Logo


Toronto

 

Every1Games Niagara Facilitator leading a tutorial on classroom computer

March Break 2016 Niagara – Registration Closes March 7th

Join Every1Games for our March Break 2016 Game Design program in Niagara from March 14 to March 18 2016 to learn how to design your own video game using Game Maker 8
software available to download at home at yoyogames.


YoYo Games Logo

Participants will practice how to brainstorm ideas for game making, create their own Game Design Document and learn about formatting and design while making friends with other neurodivergent creators (ages 12 – 25).
This program will be at the DSBN Academy, home of the Every1Games Encore after school program!
Contact Every1Games
Sign Up Now
Learn more about the March Break 2016 Niagara Program

Neurodivergent Love, Life and Learning at Autism Friendly

Autism Friendly 2015 LogoI’ve been to a lot of ‘autism’ conferences, but have never seen this many autistic youth engaged in advocating for themselves.

On August 21, 2015 Every1Games hosted the 2nd Annual Autism Friendly Unconference (AFU). AFU aims to bring together autistic and neurodivergent advocates with peers, employers, educators, agencies and government to come to a better understanding of the diversity of the autism spectrum and to inspire innovative services and supports for each other.

  • Identifying meaningful issues
  • Sharing opinions without judgement
  • Listening to the lived experiences of neurodivergent peers
  • Building relationships with other autistic adults

 

Friends!

Read the Every1Games AFU 2015 Summary, a short event report that focuses on the issues raised specifically acting as barriers to entering post secondary school and a professional career.  The summary identifies stigma, funding, parent involvement and access to information as key areas that need to be addressed to improve the quality of  life for autistic youth. Though the theme was life after school, the result was truly understanding neurodivergent love, life and learning.

 

There was a good, frank discussion about romantic relationships and how difficult it is to obtain one.

Heart design by Nicky Sztybel

AFU 2015 resulted in more than talks about jobs and education. Every1Games Administrative Coordinator and Program Developer, Christine Hughes, lead a popular discussion about sex and intimacy. We need to continue to come together to talk openly about experiences with love, sex, romance and companionship in the autism community. We are certainly excited to plan more events with this in mind so if you have any event ideas that you want to share with us, be sure to contact us either on facebook, twitter or our contact page and let us know so that we can make it happen together!

Enjoying our play lounge!

Enjoying our play lounge!

At AFU we also provided spaces where people can relax if feeling overwhelmed. Our multi-sensory lounge and play lounge were well received by participants who spent some time there.  We got some great feedback to have even better options next year (which reminds me, thanks to the folks who responded to the survey!). We also had a separated lunch room with a variety of different foods to accommodate allergies and sensory sensitivities.

 

But it’s not all fun and games. It was agreed that we need to have more engagement from the private sector, government and medical communities.  When these  groups come to a better understanding of neurodiversity it will reduce serious problems raised at the event including police violence against neurodivergent citizens and doctors refusing to believe neurodivergent people’s self-reports of symptoms.

Thank You. This event was hosted by Every1Games made possible by George Brown College, Ryerson University and Autism Ontario Toronto Chapter and the neurodiverse organizing committee made up of staff and students advocating for themselves and their friends.

Spec Ops 4 – Post-Mortem

The Spec Ops – Video Game Development program is often considered a capstone program at Every1Games. Spec Ops offers creative neurodivergent students a place where they can come and learn to create one of the leading forms of art and entertainment in contemporary society – video games.

When taken as a whole, video game development may seem daunting. The idea of making a video game conjures up a highly stressful environment where some mythical renaissance character does everything from art to programming to make their game. In reality, whole teams come together to contribute to one major project at a time.

This means that the video game industry is one in which all sorts of talents can be nurtured and developed. There are 3D artists, who can work on modelling (creating 3D representations of objects for games), rigging (giving a skeletal structure to the models), and animating (making those same representations come to life). 2D artists may work in creating user interface, textures, and concept art, all of which contribute to the user’s in-game experience. There are programmers, who communicate directly with computers to turn the video game into… well, a game. Games aren’t fun when the opponent doesn’t play back, after all. Designers work to develop the premise, balance, and feel of a game, and sound engineers enrich the world with audio feedback and cues.

All of these roles, and many more, work together to create a game.

That was what we did in Spec Ops 4.

The End-Game (Goals)

Since our program development is an iterative process, the facilitators of Spec Ops once more made it a goal to learn from the past. We kept the most fun, most engaging, most skill-developing parts of previous Spec Ops sessions. Everything else was re-examined and re-evaluated before either being approached from a different angle or being dropped from the curriculum entirely.

To ensure this instance of the program ran smoothly, we had two facilitators at any given point: one artist and one programmer (me!). We also had a variety of support staff on hand, including organizational leads and audio engineers, to help cultivate an interest in other skills related to video game production.

We spent a good deal of time considering what was important for participants to get out of the program. With the range of video game development experiences our participants would have in mind, we came up with the following goals:

  • Introduce participants to a variety of different roles in the video game industry, including art, programming, audio, and design.
  • Create a low-stress environment that encourages participants to develop higher-level social skills by encouraging self-advocacy and positive interaction.
  • Make a video game with maximal contribution from participants and minimal contribution from staff.

We decided the best way to do this was to start off with a relatively heavy ‘class’ load at the beginning, with a shift to emphasize game development in later days.

The idea behind this was to equip participants with rudimentary skills they’d need to contribute to the game in the manner of their choosing. It would also help them identify their strengths and weaknesses while sampling the many roles the video game industry has to offer. Essentially, this structure let them decide what they liked and enjoyed while eliminating roles that were just not for them. As staff, it allowed us to shift and change the curriculum to suit the interests of our participants.

Pre-Production (Early Game Design)

The first two days of Spec Ops were spent getting to know each other and determining the type of game we wanted to make.

We started by naming elements and features that make a game appealing to us. Suggestions ranged from first-person shooters to MOBA (multiplayer online battle arena) games, with everything in between considered as well. By the end of this exercise, we had a massive list of potential options. Obviously we couldn’t do everything suggested, so we started paring down the list, finding common elements and eliminating unrealistic goals.

After a few hours of back and forth discussion, voting, and bringing new ideas to the table, we had a loose concept of what we wanted to develop.  We went with an endless, arena-style space shooter with a sort of gritty, hopeless feel. We also ideally wanted to heavily emphasize narrative.

By the end of the second day, we even had a name: The Final Marine.

Main Production (The Classroom Experience)

After we had the game concept settled, we spent the next couple of days doing crash-courses in a number of different tools used by industry game developers to make games. We dabbled in Photoshop, Illustrator, 3dsmax, Maya, HTML/CSS, Unity Engine Editor, TFM Music Maker, C#, and other programs.

This let all participants start learning concepts that were totally new to them without pressuring them to immediately make a game.  As we hoped, participants began to explore the fields and roles they were interested in.

The added benefit for facilitators was being able to cater courses more specifically to participant interest. It wasn’t long before modelling was front and center stage, a crowd favourite among our participants. Around the same time, programming was more or less dropped from the curriculum entirely.

We worked in groups at various points, fostering discussions and developing our game further. While participants were happy to keep working on their pet projects, they also began to get excited about working on The Final Marine. Some of them were improving the design, while others had already started to model assets they thought might be useful in our game.

Alpha Production (From the Classroom to the Studio)

Work on The Final Marine began in earnest late into our second week.

Participants were given a list of assets that the game would need and decided for themselves what to work on. At this point, it already became apparent who favoured which role; we had about three or four modellers (one of whom is a budding rigger/animator, the others who are content to remain modelling specialists), two 2D art specialists, two game designers, and one lonely programmer.

Most participants were also eager to experiment with two or three roles. Our modellers also showed interest in 2D art, for example. Everyone also enjoyed the design aspect of a game and was willing to discuss and compromise in various ways. The Final Marine began to take shape, with some place-holder assets and concepts to flesh out in the future.

Beta Production (Studio Environment)

By the end of the third week, we moved almost exclusively into game development. We spent very little time doing crash-courses, instead opting to help participants work on their assets on a one-to-one level.

If a participant did not need any guidance, they continued to develop their assets at their own pace. They submitted assets for addition into the game when they were satisfied with their work. During this time, we received many polished assets for integration, including a sky box, environment assets, and a number of different particle effects for use in the game.

This marked a very industrious but quiet time for Spec Ops. Lunch was no longer a welcome break and refreshing chance to socialize, but rather an interruption into their technical skill and asset development.

Did I mention that The Final Marine was starting to look really good?

Gold Production/Release (The Grand Finale)

In major studios, a game getting released is cause for much excitement. The Final Marine was finished one early afternoon in our fourth week. All assets were integrated, the level had been designed and implemented, and the game worked.

Participants were given the rest of the day to reflect and socialize with the team, before a grand unveiling demonstration in the final few hours.

I will close this section with the words of one of our participants:

“I almost don’t believe it. We made a game. We actually made one. We’re game developers now.

Conclusion

Spec Ops was a huge success.

The participants were both creative and driven, balancing personal needs and desires with the team’s goals throughout. Students learned that there is room for everybody in game development, regardless of their interests or original skill level.

Skill-wise, they universally improved across the board. Participants went from not necessarily knowing what a model was to modelling full characters, and from knowing a lot about video games to knowing about video game production. They worked with industry standard software to make a game in a small studio environment.

With the help of George Brown College’s facilities and facilitators, who were able to help nurture participant interests, we expect a number of the participants will continue to develop the foundation Spec Ops set out for them. Spec Ops has a proven history of growing with its participants.

It might have been The Final Marine, but it won’t be the final step for the participants. It sure won’t be the final Spec Ops.

Game link: coming soon to a postmortem near you!

Kayla Wright

Note: That last line was fairly melodramatic, but it wasn’t dishonest. It won’t be the final Spec Ops. The next installment of Spec Ops has tentative start dates in late September/early October. Mosey on over to the Programs page for more information! specOpsIcon-3-300x270

Spec Ops 3 – Post Mortem

Written by Rocco Briganti

The Spec Ops 3 – Video Game Development program is the capstone program at Every1Games. Creative neurodivergent students from different walks of life finally have a place where they can come and learn about and how to create, one of the leading forms of art and entertainment – video games.

Spec Ops Team

Some of the SpecOps Team: Daniel, Devonttaie, John Yau, Crystal Fernandez, Rocco Briganti and Joshua

An Upgraded Direction

Spec Ops 3 took the best of the previous programs and learned from past programs. During this program we continued along the path of keeping the class operating as a team would in a studio. We had a clear idea and focus about how the program would run. The Spec Ops 3 team was better equipped now with four facilitators ranging in talents including, but not limited to: animation, programming, modelling and game design. We also had two goals…

  1. Developing a game and if not, at the very least a portfolio piece for every student.
  2. Expanding and advancing student’s social skills.

We continued along the familiar path of brainstorming a game first with the class and then dividing everyone up into roles that each student wanted to work on. This time we had some new students with fresh talent. Roles ranged from sound engineers to modellers and animators.

Early Game Design

In our first week we brainstormed with the class on what some of their favourite genres were for video games. After a lot of talking and some back and forth debates we ended up with a Steampunk Robot Escape style game. One of our facilitators, Daniel Mozarowski took the class through Game Design principals and theory as we brainstormed how the game would be played. It was wonderful to watch students who normally appeared to be shy, open up in passionate discussion, conversation and the odd friendly debate about mechanics, story and what makes a game fun.

Once we had everything laid out another one of our Facilitators, John Yau, took the stage creating some concept art for our game. This concept art was created by tasking students with finding images and references that they pictured for the game we had brainstormed and its genre. Throughout the course of the 8 weeks the students used the created piece for inspiration and reference when creating content for the game.

Production Phase

At the very beginning of the program, myself and the rest of the facilitators had made a decision that if creating a market ready game was not achievable during the programs length then we would work on helping students achieve a portfolio piece. During our fourth week we had a discussion about this. Myself and the rest of the team decided that given the varying range of talent and experience, it was best to change our focus. From this point on, we continued the course by focusing on helping each student grow both socially and technically.

Spec Ops Support Package

Spec Ops 3 was not only host to a pool of creative and talented neurodiverse individuals but for this first time ever, host to the parents, friends and family who continuously help drive our students forward beyond the classroom. This was our first time having a parent’s open house style gathering where parents, friends and family could come in and see what everyone had been working on. For the facilitators, this provided the perfect opportunity for some one on one time with student’s family members which might have not otherwise happened.

Overall, this was an overwhelming success. Facilitators got to witness our student’s showing off their creativity to their family members and in turn family members saw what their children were capable of producing. Parents were ecstatic to hear the progress their children have made and taken aback by the work that they had created. Some family members were seeing for the first time all the work that gets put into creating even the most basic of games.

Conclusion

This has been our best Spec Ops program yet at Every1Games with the help of George Brown College facilities. We’ve pushed students farther in honing their skills and prepping for the game development world with the latest industry standard software. Students have shown growth in not only technical skills but social skills as well. Our students continue to inspire and teach us as well with every Spec Ops program outdoing the last. With this mind, I can’t wait to see what’s in store for Spec Ops in the fall.

 

Registration for the next Spec Ops: Video Game Development program opens soon. Make an account to register!

Rocco Briganti

 

 

Autism Friendly Logo

2nd Annual Autism Friendly Unconference; Life After High School

AFU header

Every1Games invites you to Autism Friendly, a free event that brings together people to share questions, answers, and experiences related to autism.

If you’re autistic or neurodivergent and are willing to share something of your experience, or just want to meet informally with others, come on along. If you have questions or can offer a perspective on what it means to be autistic, join us at George Brown College on Saturday Aug 15 (10:00am – 4:00pm) to participate in Autism Friendly.

Participants of last years AFU were clear that Ontario’s support system needs improvement especially in the area of employment training and ASD sensitivity from co-workers. The autistic youth at the event were very clear, asking employers for guidance and understanding, instead of doubt and low expectations.

This years event aims to provide a more in depth discussion surrounding higher education and employment to identify issues and barriers as well as a plan of action that will lead to a better understanding of the diversity of the autism spectrum.

We again invite autistic self-advocates to come together with their peers, employers, educators, agencies and government to take another step forward in building an autism friendly future.

  • Judgment Free 
  • Breakfast and Lunch
  • Mutli-Sensory Lounge
  • Raffle Prizes

When you register please suggest a topic or as a question so that together we can address what is most meaningful to you. The most asked questions and suggested topics will become sessions in different rooms. There are 15 sessions available (5, 45 minute sessions in 3 different rooms).

Autism Friendly is an opportunity to grow personally and professionally learning more about working with diversity while supporting autism in the workplace, at school and in the community.

Thank You!

Thank you to Autism Ontario Toronto Chapter for their support helping us bring delicious food for everyone to this great event! Thank you to George Brown College for providing space and support.  Thank you to Ryerson University, SSHRC and OCE Social Entrepreneur Fellowship for supporting our outreach initiatives.

The Organizing Committee

The organizing committee is a neurodiverse group of staff who work at Every1Games Professional Services Inc.

Christine Hughes

Damian Laxton

Mark Beaudry

Matthew Pegnam

Jacob Yorke

Jeremy Lyons

Krystal Twiss

Sarah Drew

Other FAQs

What is an Unconference?

An unconference is a “participant driven meeting”. There is no pre-determined speakers or panels. Instead, we collect questions and suggestions from people attending  to drive discussion based on what topics participants find most interesting or pertinent.

Who is Coming?

  • Neurodivergent Post-Secondary Students and Self Advocates, Families and Wellness Professionals.
  • At this event, you represent you and only you.

What are my transport/parking options getting to the event?

George Brown has provided details on various parking lots for the St. James Campus. Here is a link to view the details. If taking the TTC, the closest subway station is Queen Station, you can take the 501 or 504 Street Car from there to Jarvis and Queen St. E. It is a short walk from there. Please visit Google Maps or TTC Trip Planner to recieve directions from your location.
What can/can’t I bring to the event?

You can bring comfort / stim items, questions and perspective. Due to food allergies, please do not bring your own food to the event. If you require accomdation or specific dietary items please contact christine@every1games.ca.

Where can I contact the organizer with any questions?
You can contact Krystal Twiss at engage@every1games.ca with questions about this event.

Created by Every1Games student Matthew Montgomery

Panoptic: Creative Production

PanopticNew Participants Welcome at any week!
Come and join us one, two or all four weeks of Creative Production
In the Panoptic Creative Production Program we will  explore a variety of different production types, focusing on video production. Develop your skills in Adobe Premier, After Effects, and other cinematic tools as well as some modelling/ art  programs such as Maya, Adobe Photoshop and 3DS Max. We will also be making a weekly trip as well as having professionals from the video game industry visit us. Trips include 3DXL: A Large Scale 3D Printing Exhibit, a Tour of the City TV Building and a trip to the movies.
Facilitators have experience in video production and video game development.
*Recommended for Ages 12 – 25.
Week 1 –  July 20 – July 24
Week 2 –  July 27 – July 31
Week 3 – August 3 – August 7
Week 4 – August 10 – August 14
 Facilitators
Jacob Yorke
Tanmay Datta
Mark Beaudry
Damian Laxton
If you have any questions feel free to email Krystal at engage@every1games.ca

Learn More about this course, or sign up for this course by clicking the link below.

Sign Up Now

Every1Games Introduces Social Nights@ Snakes and Lattes

Prepare for the most awesome Monday nights with your neurodivergent friends. Every1Games introduces the first of our social night series Social Nights@ hosted by resident creative artists Veronica Brzoska and Matthew Pegnam. Our Social nights will be at Toronto’s most popular board cafe Snakes and Lattes! Hang outwith Every1Games and become friends and build relationships with board game players and creators while testing board game prototypes. There will also be opportunities to try other games that are available at the cafe, from Monopoly to Munchkinz there are board games for everyone. Recommended for ages 16+.
Thanks to the Potential Programme and Autism Ontario Toronto Chapter this social skills program is FREE to attend!

Where: Snakes & Lattes at 600 Bloor St W

Screen Shot 2015-07-08 at 9.07.03 PM

When: 6pm – 9pm

  1. Monday, August 17th, 2015
  2. Monday, August 31st, 2015
  3. Monday, September 21st, 2015
  4. Monday, October 5th, 2015
  5. Monday, October 19th, 2015

Free for Autism Ontario Members!

Want to know more about Game Development Night? Check out this video!

Want to know more about Snakes & Lattes Board Game Collection?

To join us for Social Nights@